Long term planning

Deborah Weston

A long term plan sets out programme of study over a complete key stage or sometimes more than one key stage. It is sometimes called ‘a curriculum map’. The key factor is that it is a summary and therefore brief - usually no more than one side of A4 in length.

The purpose of a long term plan is to show:

  • when certain units will be studied in the year and the sequence of units – although this may be modified should the need arise
  • the length of each unit expressed as hours or number of weeks
  • the title of the unit usually expressed as a key question
  • the religion, belief and/or theme that is the focus of the unit to make it possible to demonstrate:
    • the total learning experiences planned for a pupil in a subject in each year group of the school
    • opportunities for linking learning experiences between schemes or subject areas
    • outline compliance with an Agreed Syllabus, Diocesan or other guidelines
A simple template for a long term plan might look like this:
Autumn Term Spring Term Summer Term
Year# Unit 1: Title Religion or belief focus... Theme focus... Unit 2: Title Religion or belief focus... Theme focus... Unit 3: Title Religion or belief focus... Theme focus...
Year# Unit 4: Title Religion or belief focus... Theme focus... Unit 5: Title Religion or belief focus... Theme focus... Unit 6: Title Religion or belief focus... Theme focus...
Year# Unit 7: Title Religion or belief focus... Theme focus... Unit 8: Title Religion or belief focus... Theme focus... Unit 9: Title Religion or belief focus... Theme focus...

Another model which may be useful where the local Agreed Syllabus, Diocesan or other guidelines have been developed using the non-statutory National Framework for RE (2004).might look like this:

Year# Unit Title Religion and
belief / theme focus
Key Concept
Expressed as a question e.g. What do people believe about God?

e.g. Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism,
Islam, Judaism, Sikhism,
Secular world view e.g.
Humanism A religion in the local community
e.g. Jainism, the Baha’i Faith or Zoroastrianism
e.g. religion, family and community or inspirational people

Beliefs, teachings and sources

Practices and ways of life

Forms of expressing meaning

Identity, diversity and belonging

Meaning, purpose and Truth

Values and commitment

This may also be represented in the form of a annual table showing which units appear at particular points in the year. There would be an individual table for each year group.

Year #
Autumn Term 1
Autumn Term 2
Spring Term 1
Spring Term 2
Summer Term 1
Summer Term 2